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Rising Sun_Uluru_Central Australia

Rising Sun_Uluru_Central Australia

Hasselblad 503CW Camera and Hasselblad 150mm Sonnar f4 lens with Kodak Professional Ektachrome 100VS film

Here’s a most untypical view of Uluru, a photographic and tourist icon in Central Australia. I’ve been fortunate to photograph the rock at sunrise and sunset; in bright and inclement weather; at midday and early evening. I’ve walked around Uluru, but have never climbed it. It never fails to awe me with its beauty and power.

The above image was made shortly after sunrise as the quick rising sun began to warm the landscape. With most folk either sleeping or shooting from the designated sunrise location, I continued around to the opposite side of Uluru and position myself for a very different experience.

The dynamic diagonal line of the rock and the shape of the trees produce a strong silhouette while the presence of the sun adds a sense of hope and explores the notion of time within the still photograph.

You haven’t experienced Australia until you visit the Uluru/Kata Tjuta National Park. Do all you can to visit and, when you do, ensure you stay for at least 4 days. You’ll need that much time to explore the many wonderful photographic opportunities offered.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Sunset_Uluru

Uluru Sunset reveals shapes and textures in the landscape

Hasselblad 503cw camera and Hasselblad 50mm f4 Distagon FEL T lens with Kodak Professional Ektachrome 100VS film

Surely one of Australia’s most iconic natural attractions, the Uluru/Kata Tjuta National Park offers the visitor a range of fantastic locations for landscape photography. The above image was made from the car park where visitors often find themselves viewing the changing colors of the rock either side of sunset.

The low angled sun, skimming across the landscape, highlights the textural qualities of the foreground grasses and looming clouds as well as bringing out the shape of the rock. These qualities have been further enhanced through a black-and-white rendering.

I made this image towards the end of a long day. I was up well before sunrise to photograph the rock. I then undertook the long walk around Uluru, which was great fun and provided numerous images with which I remain happy to this day. Following an afternoon exploration through the Valley of the Winds at nearby Kata Tjuta I returned to the final location of the day where this image was made.

If you haven’t already had the opportunity I can certainly recommend a few days at Uluru/Kata Tjuta National Park. I’ve been fortunate to have journeyed there on three occasions and look forward to another visit in the not too distant future.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Pic of the Week_Water Pool_Uluru_Central Australia

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm Summicron f2 Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Uluru is Australia’s most iconic landscape. Situated in the Uluru / Kata Tjuta National Park it is a superb location for photography and offers the visitor a wonderful introduction to the culture and mythology of the local indigenous people.

The above image makes use of foreground (grasses), mid ground (rock) and background (sky) elements to enhance the sense of 3-dimensional space.

One of the problems with photographing under bright, sunny conditions is that the bright light acts to reflect much of the color and texture off the surface of important focal points (e.g. rock, sand and grasses). By employing a polarizing filter its possible to prevent this from happening and produce images that display quite vivid color reproduction. In much the same way as polarizing sunglasses a polarizing filter can also darken and saturate and already blue sky. It works best when the sun is directly behind the photographer.

After scanning the original 35mm color transparency was processed in Adobe Camera RAW and Adobe Photoshop CS4.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Tree and Rock_Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park_Central Australia

 

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm Summicron-M series Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm Summicron-M Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Here’s a detail of a tree at Uluru in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in Central Australia. This is a truly wonderful place to both photograph the natural environment and gain an understanding of local indigenous culture and mythology. But, with so much to see and do, its worthwhile allowing 5 days or more to explore both Uluru (Ayers Rock) and the nearby Kata Tjuta (The Olgas) some 50 km away. Keen photographers will want to visit both locations at sunrise and sunset. The walk around the rock (Uluru) after a sunrise shoot is well worthwhile, as is the magnificent Valley of the Winds walk at Kata Tjuta. Just outside the park the tourist settlement at Yulara offers a range of accommodation, dining and shopping options for visitors.

Lots of visitors like to climb Uluru. For many the climb is a major part of what has become somewhat of a pilgrimage for many Australians over recent decades. The traditional owners request that visits refrain from making the climb. I’ve visited the rock on three occasions and have respected this request. As this is a culturally sensitive area I’m also careful to follow the guidelines as to what should and should not be photographed.

I would advise any visitors to the park to spend a little time researching these guidelines and visit the information centre as soon as possible after arrival. This will help provide a better understanding of the importance of these natural icons in the mythology of traditional owners and the value of the park to all Australians. A more enlightened view may well result in the production of more sensitive and evocative images.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography 

Uluru Twilight_Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park_Central Australia

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm F2 Summicron-M Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm F2 Summicron-M Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Probably Australia’s most iconic natural landscape location, Uluru is a must visit for photographers. This image was made at dusk with the aid of very diffuse light. The cloud on the left side of the image was illuminated and positioned within the frame for just a few seconds, prior to moving out of the frame just as the light in the rock and cloud dimmed.

The contrast in this image was just within the range of the film used. As a result the detail in the bright clouds and darkest areas of the rock is minimal. Nevertheless, the mood of this image is quite evocative and I’ve glad to share it with you all, particularly as I’ve never shown it to anyone previously. I feel this image conveys my response to this iconic location during that most mysterious time at the edge of the day.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Detail_Uluru_Central Australia

 

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M series Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M series Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

The making of this photo was a surreal experience. I was photographing Uluru (Ayers Rock) in the Uluru / Kata Tjuta National Park in Central Australia. Famous for its ability to change color in response to the changing weather and light conditions, this magnificent sandstone monolith is a wonder to behold and provides a range of opportunities for the landscape photographer.

While I’ve very much enjoyed photographing the rock in a range of ways and at various times of day, this particular image is one of my more abstract interpretations. I’ve long been fascinated by how the color of light can influence the color of the subject being depicted. After photographing a more expansive scene I noticed that light was reflecting various parts of the rock and surrounding landscape into a small puddle near my feet. In the resulting image the orange to yellow hue of the sunlit rock is evident, as is the cooler color of the heavily shaded monolith on the left side of the image. On the right we have the clump of grass, the reddish reflection of a shaded part of the rock and the reflected light from the blue sky mixed with the red earth below.

This was actually quite a difficult image to make. The hot, bright sun was beating down on the back of my neck and the clear reflections present in the puddle were constantly being disturbed by hordes of group tourists, many of whom found the need to tap me on the shoulder and point upwards to suggest that it was the rock and not the puddle that I should be photographing.

 

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M series Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M series Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

 

For fun I’ve included a black-and-white version of the image for the purposes of comparison. One image explores variations in color, the other in tonality.

The image was made with a Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M series Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography 

Pic of the Week – Sunrise, Ormiston Gorge, Central Australia

The terms ‘Back of Burke’, ‘Outback’ and ‘Woop Woop’ are Australian euphemisms for remoteness. And, outside of its major areas of population, Australia has more remoteness than most other countries.

Central Australia or the ‘Red Centre’ is home to many of Australia’s grandest landscape icons. Uluru (Ayres Rock), Kata Tjuta (The Olgas) and Kings Canyon are all within a day’s drive of Alice Springs, the regions largest town.

Now here’s a little bit of local knowledge. There are many other locations in the region that provide fantastic opportunities for landscape photography. In fact I’ve yet to find anywhere else that provides such a unique and mesmerising mix of light and color. Though to experience it you’d want to be sitting quietly, at the edges of the day, in an area open to and able to reflect light. Very much about time and place, such sites offer a sanctuary from the stresses and strains of the modern world.

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