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Incoming Tide_Loch Ard Gorge_Great Ocean Road

Incoming Tide_Loch Ard Gorge_Great Ocean Road

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Can you see the crashing wave in this image?

Shot on a wind blown, overcast day this image of Loch Ard Gorge is a favourite location for tourists along the Great Ocean Road. Famous for a range of shipwrecks, including the Loch Ard in 1878, the rugged cliff faces and enclosed nature of the landscape were well suited to the panoramic format. The wide-angle lens exaggerated the foreground elements and, as a consequence, increased the sense of diminishing perspective in the background.

I made the above image with the wonderful Hasselblad X-PAN II camera (no longer made) with the amazing Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens. When used in conjunction with the panoramic format the wide-angle characteristics of this lens open up a world of interesting photographic possibilities.

The original color transparency was scanned then imported into Adobe Lightroom 3 for basic processing. Adobe Photoshop CS5 was employed to convert the color file into black-and-white and then to apply a lovely warm, chocolate tone.

It’s all very well to travel along the Great Ocean Road to The Twelve Apostles. But rather than spending most of you time in the car, travelling to and from, consider taking your time and spend 2 or 3 days breaking the trip up into smaller sections. That will give you time to stop, walk and explore. You’ll be able to stop for decent meals in one of the numerous seaside towns along the way and, for the more intrepid, discover secluded locations most tourists well never know.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Crashing Wave_Great Ocean Road

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Good timing, a fast shutter speed and a low angle of view was all that was required to make this panoramic image of a crashing wave in the Port Campbell National Park near Victoria’s Twelve Apostles.

The simplicity of the surroundings allows the wave to stand out, as does the black-and-white rendering that seems to etch the light toned wave out from the darker sky and rocks.

I opted for a warm, sepia-like tone to add a sense of nostalgia and serenity to an otherwise dramatic scene. I often enjoy the balance that is achieved through the juxtaposition of opposites within the frame.

Image Processing was achieved in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Light Kisses

Leica R8 camera and Leica 90mm f2 Summicron-R series lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Leica R8 camera and Leica 90mm f2 Summicron-R series lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

This image features a section of one of the famous Twelve Apostles with the mighty Southern Ocean in the background. It forms part of a triptych (3 images within a single frame) that, in this case, provides an alternative to the more traditional panoramic view of the scene. I love the image’s rich colors, warm/cool color contrast, velvet-like texture and the way the light kisses the cresting wave and rock face.

Processing was conducted in Adobe Camera RAW and Adobe Photoshop CS4.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

London Arch_Great Ocean Road

 

Hasselblad X-PAN camera and Hasselblad 45mm lens with Kodak Ektachrome Professional E100VS film

Hasselblad X-PAN camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 45mm f4 lens with Kodak Professional Ektachrome E100VS film

Here’s an image from one of my all time favourite shooting locations: Victoria’s Great Ocean Road. Around 30 minutes drive further west from the famous Twelve Apostles will take you to London Arch. Formerly known as London Bridge the middle section of this once double-span natural bridge collapsed in 1990. While the similarity with its former namesake is now somewhat diminished, its still a fun place to visit and offers good photography opportunities at the edges of the day. A former boardwalk to the beach below is now closed to protect a fairy penguin colony in a cave at the bottom of the cliff.

This image was made at sunset with the last rays of the sun illuminating the sandstone cliff faces and providing a great color contrast with the cool colors of the sky and water. A long Shutter Speed provided the wispy effect in the water as it rolled on and off the beach.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Time and Tide_Great Ocean Road_Victoria

 

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Kodak Fuji Velvia 100 film

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100 film

This is one of my favourite images. Made during the afterglow in the Port Campbell National Park, near the famous Twelve Apostles, along the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia.

It was so exciting to witness the waves washing back and forward from the sea onto the cliffs and back again. The beautiful but fast-fading low light, under which I was working, required a long exposure to record the image onto the relatively low sensitivity ISO 100 film. Due to the low levels of illumination, which continued to decline during the exposure, and the narrow aperture at which I was shooting the actual exposure time was 8 minutes. I made the exposure, packed up my gear and cautiously made my way back to the car in the dark.

I’m really pleased that I’ve been able to convey the quality of the light, the warm/cool color contrast and the mysterious movement of the water.

The image was made with a Hasselblad X-Pan II camera and Hasselblad X-Pan 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100 film. Image processing was conducted with Adobe Photoshop CS3.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography 

Aerial Perspective

 

Canon 5D camera and Canon 85mm f1.2 Aspherical L series lens

Canon 5D camera and Canon 85mm f1.2 L USM lens

I made the above image during a wonderful morning helicopter flight that took in many of the most iconic locations along the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia. The image features Johanna Beach, a wild and windswept beach on the south west coast.

A short drive, through rolling green hills, off the Great Ocean Road takes you to a small campground. From there it’s only a few minutes walk to the beach. The area also offers a range of secluded cabins, catering to the needs of couples and families alike. Despite its location and suitable amenities the rugged beauty of the beach remains a relative secret to most folk rushing down to The Twelve Apostles. So, with the exception of fishermen, couples and the old family the beach is yours to enjoy and photograph.

Johanna Beach was originally named Joanna Beach after the 22-ton schooner-rigged Joanna, itself named after the daughter of its owner. Sadly the Joanna floundered off shore on its 1843 maiden voyage between Launceston, Tasmania and Port Fairy.

Aerial photos like the one above provide the viewer with a unique perspective. Normally familiar scenes are photographed from a viewpoint and distance quite different from what we would normally expect. While most aerial photography is done at an angle of around 45º, sometimes opportunities call for shooting almost straight down onto the scene. Such an extreme viewpoint, in this case achieved with the door removed from the helicopter and me leaning out and shooting almost straight downward, is referred to as a Birdseye View.

As is evident here that further challenges our sense of scale and perspective producing a very 2D view of the world. With space and depth effectively flattened, other design elements such as texture, color, line, balance and repetition are utilised to produce a dynamic result.

The image was made with a Canon 5D camera and Canon 85mm f1.2 Aspherical L series lens. The image was processed in Adobe Camera RAW and Adobe Photoshop CS3.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography 

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