• Article Index

  • Learn Photography

  • Family Portraits

Detail_Mungo National Park_NSW

Detail_Mungo National Park_NSW

Leica M7 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M Aspherical lens with Kodak Ektachrome E100VS film

Mungo National Park in far Southwest NSW, Australia is a fascinating location for exploring and photography. It’s an ancient, arid landscape that many thousands of years ago was part of a huge inland lake system that supported a range of flora and fauna and, as a consequence, the regions indigenous people.

This image was made at the end of a long day’s exploration. I’d photographed the sunset, which rendered naturally sculptured elements on the dunes into surreal, vividly colored forms. The light lingered for at least 20 minutes after sunset and produced a soft, warm glow to the landscape. Noticing the tuft of grass, on the top of a mound of sand, I moved in for a close up. It’s a straightforward image that relies on the color contrast between the grass and sand, the repetitive pattern of the lines and the bizarre relationship between the seemingly disparate elements of grass and sand.

This small tuft of grass, isolated by the surrounding sand, acts as a metaphor that could suggest a range of thoughts including the following:

  • The risk to our way of life posed by a changing environment
  • The ability to survive, despite your environment
  • Your ability to grow, despite hardship
  • People that seem to have nothing in common, co-existing peacefully

The vivid color saturation associated with Kodak Professional Ektachrome 100Vs film did a great job of portraying the strength of color in this image. I’ve employed Adobe Camera RAW and Adobe Photoshop CS4 (I processed this image prior to upgrading to CS5) to process the scanned transparency to reproduce, as accurately as possible, the colors recorded by the film. A strong vignette was added to help draw the eye towards the key foreground elements.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Advertisements

Pic of the Week_Sand Dune and Cloud_Mungo National Park_NSW

The luminous quality of the light is enhanced by the blackness of the sky in this cloud and dune, sky and ground

Leica M7 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M lens with Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 Extra Color film

Mungo National Park, in far southwest NSW, is a harsh, arid environment. But long ago it was part of an extensive inland lake system that provided local indigenous people with a bountiful food supply and, despite common perceptions, allowed them to live in seemingly permanent settlements. This challenges common perceptions that Aborigines were nomadic people, a way of life that appeared backward to the conquering British Empire. It’s now evident that indigenous Australians adapted their lifestyle and practices to the environment in which they lived.

I rendered the original image, shot on 35mm color transparency film, into black-and-white to illustrate the inherent shapes, textural qualities and tonality within the image. The luminous nature and strong shapes present in the cloud and dune have been enhanced by the deep tonality of the sky.

The high contrast nature of this image, together with the grain inherent in the film, has produced a look somewhat similar to that normally associated with black and white Infrared film. I hope you enjoy it.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Pic of the Week_Perry Sand Dunes_Southwest NSW

Canon 5D Mark II camera and Canon 24-105mm f4 L series USM lens @ 35mm. Exposure Details: 1/13 second @ f10 ISO 100.

I only had about 20 minutes to wander around and photograph at the Perry Sand Dunes near Wentworth in far southwest NSW. This image was shot directly into the sun, so flare was a problem. I crouched down low, to accentuate the size of the dune, gripped the camera with my right hand and used by left to shade the front element of the lens and, thereby, eliminate the sun spots that seemed to be having a merry old time on my lens.

I needed to ensure that I could hold depth of field (DOF) from the foreground right through to the back of the image. That, together with the low angle of view and the repeating light and dark textures within the dune, added a 3-dimensional quality to the image.

It was late afternoon and, while sunset promised soft, warm light I was an hour or so early, with commitments at the end of the day. The tonality, texture, pattern and repetition within the frame suggested a black-and-white treatment. I also wanted to give the impression of warm light in a black-and-white image so I added a warm tone to the photo during image processing.

Processing was conducted in Adobe Lightroom 2 and Adobe Photoshop CS4.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

%d bloggers like this: