• Article Index

  • Learn Photography

  • Family Portraits

Incoming Tide_Loch Ard Gorge_Great Ocean Road

Incoming Tide_Loch Ard Gorge_Great Ocean Road

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Can you see the crashing wave in this image?

Shot on a wind blown, overcast day this image of Loch Ard Gorge is a favourite location for tourists along the Great Ocean Road. Famous for a range of shipwrecks, including the Loch Ard in 1878, the rugged cliff faces and enclosed nature of the landscape were well suited to the panoramic format. The wide-angle lens exaggerated the foreground elements and, as a consequence, increased the sense of diminishing perspective in the background.

I made the above image with the wonderful Hasselblad X-PAN II camera (no longer made) with the amazing Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens. When used in conjunction with the panoramic format the wide-angle characteristics of this lens open up a world of interesting photographic possibilities.

The original color transparency was scanned then imported into Adobe Lightroom 3 for basic processing. Adobe Photoshop CS5 was employed to convert the color file into black-and-white and then to apply a lovely warm, chocolate tone.

It’s all very well to travel along the Great Ocean Road to The Twelve Apostles. But rather than spending most of you time in the car, travelling to and from, consider taking your time and spend 2 or 3 days breaking the trip up into smaller sections. That will give you time to stop, walk and explore. You’ll be able to stop for decent meals in one of the numerous seaside towns along the way and, for the more intrepid, discover secluded locations most tourists well never know.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Advertisements

Looking Seaward_Whisky Bay_Wilsons Promontory National Park

Leica MP camera and Leica 21mm f2.8 Elmarit Aspherical lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Quite light at days end provided a great opportunity to explore the relationship between the various elements within this scene. There’s a lot of information within the foreground shrubs and rocks. Their inherent color, shapes and textures provided a fairly complicated foreground. I had to be careful to position myself so that I could find the best arrangement by which I could do the following:

  • Illustrate each individual foreground element
  • Contrast the softness of the scrubs against the hardness of the rocks
  • Ensure there was sufficient space by which the viewer can navigate their way, from element to element, and then pass through to the island in the background. The small patch of sand at the bottom left of the frame provided a nice pathway into the image.

I’ve employed Adobe Lightroom 3 and Adobe Photoshop CS5 for image processing. The vivid color saturation associated with Fuji Velvia 100F film helped lift the otherwise subdued color palette. I’ve increased that saturation further during image processing. If I were to make a fine print for display I’d work to reduce the degree of saturation, particularly in the aqua/blue and magenta colors. But this is a small image, viewed on the web, and I doubt the extra punchy color will upset too many people.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Looking Seaward_Port Campbell National Park

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Here’s a relatively straightforward image that explores the concept of a frame within a frame. The rock face on the top of the cliff acts to frame the waters of the Southern Ocean below. Made along the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia the serenity of the image has been enhanced by rendering into black-and-white prior to the application of a warm sepia-like tone.

Image processing was conducted in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Crashing Wave_Great Ocean Road

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Good timing, a fast shutter speed and a low angle of view was all that was required to make this panoramic image of a crashing wave in the Port Campbell National Park near Victoria’s Twelve Apostles.

The simplicity of the surroundings allows the wave to stand out, as does the black-and-white rendering that seems to etch the light toned wave out from the darker sky and rocks.

I opted for a warm, sepia-like tone to add a sense of nostalgia and serenity to an otherwise dramatic scene. I often enjoy the balance that is achieved through the juxtaposition of opposites within the frame.

Image Processing was achieved in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Frivolous Frivolities in Photoshop

Using Photohsop CS5 to turn an otherwise mundane pic into photo illustration

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN II 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100F ilm

The above image was an adventure in desperation. I’m in the middle of a huge clean out and re-organization of both film and digital images. Along the way I discovered a panoramic image that I’d made a number of years ago on a Hasselblad X-PAN II camera. It’s a detail from the bottom of a cliff face. As its not much of an image I’II end up throwing it away. But, as I’d previously scanned it, I decided to play around for a while in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

It didn’t take long before I grew bored. I remembered the delicious chocolate chip ice cream I’d had at my best friends (Cutts) house last night. So, before you could say waffle cone, I’d converted the image of the cliff face into a melted chocolate surprise. I wondered when my niece Ali was due for a birthday. That prompted the creation of the box and wrapping paper on the right side of the image. The final touch was my name, written in sparkles.

Just a bit of fun and far more an illustration than a photograph. But that’s OK, isn’t it?

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Turmoil_Great Ocean Road

A  brooding image of a stormy sky on a wind-swept beach along the Great Ocean Road

Hasselblad X-PAN II camera and Hasselblad X-PAN 30mm f5.6 lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Here’s an image that speaks of a stormy morning on a wind-swept beach. The location itself was a lonely beach along Victoria’s Great Ocean Road. The strong wind and high tide caused me to continually scamper backwards to avoid the fast approaching water. I managed to make a few images before having to retreat back up the beach and to the car. While a brief session, it was worthwhile. The cold air and frenetic activity was invigorating and I hope the above image adequately captures the experience.

Image processing was conducted in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

Pic of the Week_Approaching Storm_Squeaky Beach

Hasselblad 503CW Camera and Hasselblad 50mm f4 Distagon lens with Fuji Velvia 100F film

Squeaky Beach, one of the most commonly visited locations on Wilsons Promontory National Park, is a great location for photography. I’ve been fortunate to visit the prom on numerous occasions. Situated on the southern most tip of the Australian mainland the wonderful landscapes, great walking trails, wildlife and varied weather patterns make it one of my favourite places.

The success of this image, made after the sun had gone down, is based upon balance, achieved though the juxtaposition of likes and opposites.

The approaching storm produced a brooding mood and a great contrast with the calmness of the water and the placement of the horizon in the middle of the frame. The separation of light and dark tones provides local increases in contrast, enhancing shape. The rocks on the left and the headland in the back right of the frame act to frame the water and increase the sense of 3-dimensional space within the image. A warm/cool split tone further enhances the sense of space by helping to lead the eye through the frame.

Image processing was conducted in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

© Copyright All Rights Reserved

Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography

%d bloggers like this: